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The National Solar Jobs Census is the most credible, annual review of the solar energy workforce in the United States. Toggle the years below to view past reports and highlights:

The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2016 is the seventh annual update on current employment, trends, and projected growth in the U.S. solar industry. The Solar Jobs Census 2016 found that solar employment increased by over 51,000 workers, a 25 percent increase over 2015. Overall, the Solar Jobs Census found there were 260,077 solar workers in 2016. Solar industry employment has nearly tripled since the first National Solar Jobs Census was released in 2010.

FULL REPORTSTATE JOBS APPENDIXPRESS RELEASEINFOGRAPHICVIDEO

solarjobscensus_infographicHighlights from Solar Jobs Census 2016:

  • One out of every 50 new jobs added in the United States in 2016 was created by the solar industry, representing 2% percent of all new jobs.
  • Solar jobs in the United States have increased at least 20 percent per year for the past four years, and jobs have nearly tripled since the first Solar Jobs Census was released in 2010.
  • Over the next 12 months, employers surveyed expect to see total solar industry employment increase by 10 percent to 286,335 solar workers.
  • In 2016, the five states with the most solar jobs were California, Massachusetts, Texas, Nevada, and Florida.

Since 2010, the National Solar Jobs Census has defined solar workers as those who spend at least 50 percent of their time on solar-related work. The Solar Foundation has consistently found that approximately 90 percent of these workers spend 100 percent of their time on solar-related work. This year’s Census was part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy and Employment Report data collection effort that included more than 500,000 telephone calls and over 60,000 emails to energy establishments in the U.S. between October and November 2016. This resulted in a total of 3,888 full completions for establishments involved in solar activity in the U.S.

Sponsors:

The Solar Foundation would like to acknowledge and thank its sponsors:

Energy Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Tilia Fund, Solar Energy Industries Association, Swinerton, E.ON, sPower, SunLink, Sungevity, Sierra Club, the California Energy Commission, and the State of New Mexico Energy Minerals and Natural Resources Department.

Thank you to Recurrent Energy, Solaria, and Sun Light & Power for their assistance with the Solar Jobs Census 2016 video.

The Solar Jobs Census 2016 was made possible through contributions from foundations and individuals like you.

Testimonials:
“Solar is an important part of our ever expanding clean energy economy in Massachusetts, supporting thousands of high-skilled careers across the Commonwealth. Through the continued development of solar incentive programs, Massachusetts is positioned to double the amount of solar for half the cost to ratepayers and maintain our position as one of the best states in the country for energy diversity.”Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker
“More and more business leaders and investors recognize that climate change presents both risks and opportunities, but they need better information to make informed decisions. The Solar Jobs Census helps provides that.”Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg L.P., philanthropist, and three-term Mayor of New York City
“It’s really a wide range of people that get hired into this industry, everybody from certified and licensed engineers to those who first learned about a solar project when we were building one in their area. A great aspect of this business is that it isn’t an exclusionary trade. It’s a teachable job that can create opportunity for people and give them a skill.”George Hershman, Senior Vice President and General Manager at Swinerton Renewable Energy
“Renewable energy use translates to bottom-line benefits such as lower and more stable energy costs for GM in the long term. With more than 67 megawatts of solar housed at 24 facilities across the globe, we see the power of sunshine as an integral part of becoming a more sustainable company.” Rob Threlkeld, Global Manager of Renewable Energy at General Motors
“As one of the world’s largest owners of rooftops, Prologis is committed to leveraging its portfolio and capabilities to host solar and other clean energy technologies. As of year-end 2016, nearly 165 MW of rooftop solar is hosted within our global portfolio of modern industrial real estate assets. Increased solar deployment is one important tool in working to address climate change, and one that simultaneously spurs job creation, as shown by The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census.” — Matt Singleton, Vice President for Global Energy and Development at Prologis
“As part of our commitment to sustainability and goal to be energy independent by 2020, IKEA is proud of its 44 MW of solar arrays atop 90 percent of our U.S. locations. We are thrilled that our solar investment has helped contribute to rapid growth in the clean tech and renewable energy industry ¾ and the creation of quality jobs and a low-carbon society as a result.”Lars Petersson, IKEA U.S. President

The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2015 is the sixth annual update of current employment, trends, and projected growth in the U.S. solar industry. Census 2015 found that the industry continues to exceed growth expectations, adding workers at a rate nearly 12 times faster than the overall economy and accounting for 1.2% of all jobs created in the U.S. over the past year. Our long-term research shows that solar industry employment has grown by 123% in the past six years, resulting in nearly 115,000 domestic living-wage jobs.

As of November 2015, the solar industry employs 208,859 solar workers, representing a growth rate of 20.2% since November 2014.

FULL REPORTFACT SHEET PRESS RELEASE VIDEO

Highlights from Census 2015:

  • Over the next 12 months, employers surveyed expect to see total employment in the solar industry increase by 14.7% to 239,625 solar workers.

Recurrent Graphic 2

  • One out of every 83 new jobs created in the U.S. since Census 2014 was created by the solar industry – representing 1.2% of all new jobs.
  • Of the 208,859 solar workers in the United States, approximately 188,000 are 100% dedicated to solar activities.
  • Wages paid to solar workers remain competitive with similar industries and provide many living-wage opportunities.
  • With 119,931 solar workers, the installation sector remains the single largest solar employment sector. The installation sector grew by almost 24% since November 2014 and by 173% since 2010.
  • The solar workforce continues to reflect greater diversity than many industry sectors, but the solar industry still has much work to do to represent the rich diversity of the overall U.S. population. Women in solar jobs increased by 2% and now represent 24% of the solar workforce.

Data for Census 2015 is derived from a statistically valid sampling and comprehensive survey of 400,000 establishments throughout the nation, in industries ranging from manufacturing, to construction and engineering, to sales. Rapid change in this industry has warranted annual examinations of the size and scope of the domestic solar labor force and updates on employers’ perspectives on job growth and future opportunities.

Infographic- National Solar Jobs Census 2014

The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2014 is the fifth annual update of current employment, trends, and projected growth in the U.S. solar industry. Census 2014 found that the industry continues to exceed growth expectations, adding workers at a rate nearly 20 times faster than the overall economy and accounting for 1.3% of all jobs created in the U.S. over the past year. Our long-term research shows that solar industry employment has grown by 86% in the past five years, resulting in nearly 80,000 domestic living-wage jobs.

As of November 2014, the solar industry employs 173,807 solar workers, representing a growth rate of 21.8% since November 2013.

FULL REPORTFACT SHEET PRESS RELEASE

Highlights from Census 2014:

  • Over the next 12 months, employers surveyed expect to see total employment in the solar industry increase by 20.9% to 210,060 solar workers.
  • One out of every 78 new jobs created in the U.S. since Census 2013 was created by the solar industry – representing 1.3% of all new jobs.
  • Of the 173,807 solar workers in the United States, approximately 157,500 are 100% dedicated to solar activities.
  • Wages paid to solar workers remain competitive with similar industries and provide many living-wage opportunities.
  • The installation sector remains the single largest source of domestic employment growth, more than doubling in size since 2010.
  • Solar workers are increasingly diverse. Demographic groups such as Latino/Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and African American, along with women and veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces now represent a larger percentage of the solar workforce than was observed in Census 2013.

Data for Census 2014 is derived from a statistically valid sampling and comprehensive survey of 276,376 establishments throughout the nation, in industries ranging from manufacturing, to construction and engineering, to sales. Rapid change in this industry has warranted annual examinations of the size and scope of the domestic solar labor force and updates on employers’ perspectives on job growth and future opportunities.


Census2013GraphicThe Solar Foundation’s highly anticipated National Solar Jobs Census 2013 found that the U.S. solar industry employed 142,698 Americans as of November 2013. This figure includes the addition of 23,682 solar workers over the previous year, representing 19.9 percent growth in employment since September 2012. During the period covered by the Census, solar employment grew 10 times faster than the national average employment rate of 1.9 percent. This growth rate is also significant in that it shows – for the first time ever – the solar industry exceeded the growth projections made in the previous year’s report. The Census was well-received by high-level stakeholders. Read the statement of support from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. Also, check out The White House slide deck using Census data which was broadcast during the enhanced State of the Union.

FULL REPORTFACT SHEET PRESS RELEASE MEDIA ADVISORY TELECONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT

Other noteworthy findings from National Solar Jobs Census 2013 include:

  • Seventy-seven percent of the nearly 24,000 new solar workers since September 2012 are new jobs, rather than existing positions that have added solar responsibilities, representing 18,211 new jobs created.
  • This comparison indicates that since data were collected for Census 2012, one in every 142 new jobs in the U.S. was created by the solar industry, and many more were saved by creating additional work opportunities for existing employees.
  • Installers added the most solar workers over the past year, growing by 22%, an increase of 12,500 workers.
  • Solar employment is expected to grow by 15.6% over the next 12 months, representing the addition of approximately 22,240 new solar workers. Forty-five percent of all solar establishments expect to add solar employees during this period.
  • Employers from each of the solar industry sectors examined in this study expect significant employment growth over the next 12 months, with nearly all of them projecting percentage job growth in the double-digits.
  • Approximately 91% of those who meet our definition of a “solar worker” (those workers who spend at least 50% of their time supporting solar-related activities) spent 100% of their time working on solar.
  • Wages paid by solar firms are competitive, with the average solar installer earning between $20.00 (median) and $23.63 (mean) per hour, which is comparable to wages paid to skilled electricians and plumbers and higher than average rates for roofers and construction workers. Production and assembly workers earn slightly less, averaging $15.00 (median) to $18.23 (mean) per hour, slightly more than the national average for electronic equipment assemblers.
  • The solar industry is a strong employer of veterans of the U.S. Armed Services, who constitute 9.24% of all solar workers – compared with 7.57% in the national economy. Solar employs a slightly larger proportion of Latino/Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander workers than the overall economy.

For the report’s release, TSF hosted a teleconference to discuss the Census’ findings and trends.

Speakers for this event included:

  • Governor Bill Ritter, Director of the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University
  • Andrea Luecke, Executive Director & President of The Solar Foundation
  • Lyndon Rive, Chief Executive Officer at SolarCity
  • Tom Werner, President and Chief Executive Office of SunPower
  • Amit Ronen, Director of The George Washington University’s Solar Institute
  • Philip Jordan, Vice President of BW Research Partnership
  • Moderator: Thomas P. Kimbis, Chairman of the Board of The Solar Foundation


Census2012GraphicOn November 14th, 2012, The Solar Foundation released its third annual National Solar Jobs Census report, which found that the U.S. solar industry currently employs 119,016 Americans. This figure represents the addition of 13,872 new solar workers and a 13.2 percent employment growth rate over the past 12 months. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in the overall economy grew at a rate of 2.3 percent during the same period*, signifying that 1 in 230 jobs created nationally over the last year were created in the solar industry. The report, produced by The Solar Foundation and in partnership with BW Research and Cornell University, was released at the Interstate Renewable Energy Council’s Clean Energy Workforce Education Conference in Albany, NY.

FULL REPORTFACT SHEET PRESS RELEASE

By comparing the job growth expectations from both our multi-year research effort and existing secondary sources, we can draw several important conclusions:

As of September 2012,

— Eighty-six percent of the nearly 14,000 new solar workers added since August 2011 represent new jobs, rather than existing positions that have added solar responsibilities.

— Installers added the most solar workers over the past year, more than offsetting declines in manufacturing. While this subsector is dominated by small firms, employment is growing most dramatically at larger firms, suggesting consolidation and maturation of the installation sector.

— Solar employment is expected to grow by 17.2 percent over the next 12 months, representing the addition of approximately 20,000 new solar workers. Forty-four percent of all solar firms expect to add solar employees during this period.

— Employers from all of the solar industry subsectors examined in this study expect significant employment growth over the next 12 months, with nearly all of them projecting percentage job growth in the double-digits.

— Nearly half of installation firms expect to add solar workers in the next year, adding a total of nearly 12,000 jobs (21 percent growth year-over-year).

— Approximately 90 percent of those who meet our definition of a “solar worker” (those workers who spend at least 50 percent of their time supporting solar-related activities) actually spend 100 percent of their time working on solar.

— Over half of all firms (across all subsectors) generate 100 percent of their revenues exclusively from solar.

— Employers are increasingly less likely to span multiple subsectors, suggesting that firms are beginning to specialize.

Much more in the FULL REPORT

Read what the media is writing about the National Solar Jobs Census 2012:

BloombergPV MagazinePolitico Morning Energy
CleanTechnicaForbes (#1)Politico Pro (subs. req.)
EarthTechling (#1)Solar Industry Mag (#1)PV Tech
Renewable Energy WorldSustainable BusinessGrist Magazine
ClimateProgressThe Atlantic WireSilicon Beat
AOL EnergySolar Novus24/7 Wall St.
Phoenix Business JournalContractor MagazinePower Engineering Magazine
Nonprofit QuarterlySolarServerClean Energy Authority
US Department of EnergyEarthTechling (#2)Politico Morning Energy (#2)
Climate ProgressForbes (#2)Solar Industry Mag (#2)


Census2011GraphicOn October 17th, The Solar Foundation, in partnership with GreenLMI and Cornell University, released its National Solar Jobs Census 2011 report. Much like the award-winning National Solar Jobs Census 2010, the Census 2011 sheds light on the solar industry’s impact on the overall economy through labor market data. Building off of last year’s highly defensible baseline jobs numbers, Census 2011 contains additional information on the top twenty states for solar jobs, employer workforce challenges and needs, and recommendations for employers, policymakers and workforce training providers.

FULL REPORTFACT SHEET PRESS RELEASE

In part, Census 2011 found:

  • 100,237 jobs as of August 2011
  • 6.8% growth from August 2010 to August 2011 – growing nearly ten times faster than the overall economy
  • 6,735 new solar jobs created between August 2010 and August 2011
  • Employers expect to increase their workforce by 24% next year, creating 24,000 net new solar jobs

Also included you will find:

  • Top twenty states for solar jobs ranked
  • Recommendations for policymakers, workforce training providers, employers
  • Company profiles
  • Value chain breakdown for top five states

Compared with the overall economy, which grew only 0.7% during that same period, the solar industry is an economic bright spot.

Click below to read what the media is saying:

On camera interviews with Executive Director Andrea Luecke:

Listen to an International City/County Management Association podcast with Andrea Luecke on the Census

Click below to read press reports on the prerelease of our top-line numbers:

In 2010, The Solar Foundation (TSF) released the National Solar Jobs Census 2010. TSF contracted with Green LMI, a labor market research firm, and partnered with Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations to author the first-of-its-kind report. The award-winning Census established the first credible solar jobs baseline and continues to provide policy-makers with tangible proof that the solar industry is having a positive and substantial impact on the U.S. economy.

FULL REPORTWEBINAR

The report was released at the Solar Power International 2010 conference in Los Angeles on October 13, 2010 at the Census Release Party, sponsored by RenewableEnergyWorld.com, HeliosUSA, Hunton & Williams, and Yingli Solar.

The positive responses to The Solar Foundation’s research exemplify the widespread need in for data demonstrating the value of solar energy to the U.S. economy. We strive to continually improve our work in this area and provide more research showing the value of both public and private sector investments in solar energy. In the absence of Bureau of Labor Statistics data on the full range of solar occupations, it is of critical importance to the solar industry that organizations like ours conduct this type of research that not only help us to better understand the needs of employers (so that we can better design training programs that lead to more qualified and skilled employees), but also to give policymakers an indication of how solar is creating jobs in their districts.

In a press release for National Solar Jobs Census 2010,Secretary of Labor Hilda L Solis said:

“Among other things, this study shows that investments made through Recovery Act—including the $2.3 billion in tax credits to U.S. based clean energy manufacturing—are already generating positive results. The solar energy sector is an increasingly important source of good jobs for Americans. Fostering the growth of this emerging industry will help protect our environment, ensure the U.S. remains competitive in the global economy, and offer great opportunities for the nation’s working families.”

See what the media said about the National Solar Jobs Census 2010: